Groundbreaking trials coming to Sayton-area Parkinson’s patients


Staff report



DAYTON – Dayton-area residents with Parkinson’s disease could be among the first to participate in groundbreaking trials, now that Premier Health and Wright State University have been accepted into the Parkinson’s Study Group (PSG).

PSG is the largest nonprofit network of Parkinson centers in North America. In the past three decades, clinics participating in the group have played a vital role in bringing some of the most innovative drugs to the market. Many of these medications have had a significant impact upon changing the course of the neurological disease.

“This is an honor for our site and also an incredible opportunity for Parkinson’s patients in Southwest Ohio,” said Mary Feldman, DO, a neurologist with Premier Health, who specializes in movement disorders. “We are talking about having free access to trials focused on neuroprotection. That means medications that work to change the course of the disease rather than just treat the symptoms.”

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects one million Americans. Symptoms of the disease often progress over a course of years, and may look different from person to person. Symptoms usually include a tremor mainly at rest, slowness of movement, limb rigidity, and gait and balance issues.

Patients who choose to participate in PSG trials will have access to medications that may not reach the market until years later. In addition, the trial covers all associated costs including medication, clinical visits, laboratory tests and neuroimaging.

“They also get to contribute to research, which I have found is a huge passion of those who are suffering from the disease,” said Dr. Feldman, who will conduct the trials through Premier Health’s Clinical Neuroscience Institute. “Patients have often told me that if they are going to have to suffer from this disease they want to have a purpose in the midst of it. Playing a role in furthering our research is a significant contribution.”

Premier Health is already a very active site for Parkinson’s disease clinical trials, Dr. Feldman said. Its association with PSG will help take its work to the next level and will allow for additional opportunities for Parkinson’s patients in the Dayton area.

Patients who are interested in participating in a trial can contact the Clinical Neuroscience Institute by calling 844-277-2894.

Staff report

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