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Community meeting to discuss drug crisis

By Melanie Speicher - mspeicher@sidneydailynews.com



Did you know?

According to the Shelby County Task Force annual report released for 2016:

• The Wilson Health Birthing Center had 34 babies born whose mothers had a positive drug test during their pregnancy. Seven tested positive for heroin. Babies born at Wilson Health exposed to heroin are transferred to Dayton Children’s medical center for further treatment.

• Naloxone or Narcan is a pharmaceutical drug that blocks or reverses the effects of opioid medication. In 2016, the Sidney Fire Department administered 171 doses; Wilson Health emergency room administered 80 doses; Sidney Police administered three doses and Fort Loramie Police administered one dose. In 2015, Sidney Fire administered 78 doses while Wilson Health ER administered 33 doses.

• Sidney Police completed 142 reports that included a drug code. There were 52 adults and 12 juveniles charged with a drug violation. The department presented 106 individuals to the grand jury for a drug violation with 234 separate drug charges presented to the grand jury. Twenty-three individuals contacted the department for help for themselves or a family member.

• The Shelby County Juvenile Court processed 62 cases for prohibition and drug abuse.

• The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office reports 161 inmates received substance abuse and/or mental health counseling. Forty inmates were referred to the Vivitrol program. There were 152 inmates set up on withdrawal protocol. Two inmates were HIV positive and five inmates were pregnant and addicted to drugs. The office completed 85 reports that included a drug code. Sixty-two adults were charged with a drug violation. Six adults were charged for cultivation or manufacturing drugs. Two juveniles were charge with a drug violation. Eight adults were arrested for trafficking in heroin. Four adults were arrested for possession of heroin. Fifty-four cases were presented to the grand jury for a drug violation. Twelve cases were presented to the grand jury for illegal conveyance of drugs into a detention facility. There were 104 separate drug charges presented to the grand jury.

• The Shelby County Health Department condemned one home due to methamphetamines. There were 10 overdose fatalities in 2016; nine in 2015.

• The Shelby County Counseling Center had 514 clients with a drug or alcohol assessment. Seventy-six clients (repeat) had an updated drug and alcohol assessment. Twenty-four clients that started during the year were successfully participating in the Vivitrol program at the end of 2016.

• In 2016, 229 people inquired about Samaritan Works and space availability. Nine men and 14 women were served. Seven of eight graduates were successful and sober at the end of the year. Four residents left the program early and are in stable recovery.

• The Shelby County Prosecutor dealt with 314 indictments and 689 charges filed. Of the charges filed, 382 were directly related to drugs and another 572 charges were directly or indirectly related to drugs. In 2016, 83 percent of all charges were directly or indirectly related to drugs.

• Tri County Board of Recovery and Mental Health provides funding for inpatient treatment at NOVA Behavioral Health in Dayton. Fifty-four Shelby County residents were referred to NOVA. Thirty-three of the referrals were for heroin and 21 were for all other substances. There were 31 people admitted with 18 of them for heroin.

• Troopers from the Piqua Post of the Ohio Highway Patrol initiated 167 drug arrests in 2016. Forty-six were felony drug arrests. In 2016, Shelby County had eight traffic fatalities with 38 percent impairment. Troopers made 417 impaired driving arrests.

• Job & Family Services reported that 22 our of 36 child care cases were placed due to opiates in the home. Nine out of 21 children were placed in foster care because of drugs in the home. Twenty-nine out of 37 children were placed with alternative family care due to opiates in the home. For the past two years, 50 percent of all placements were due to opiates. At the en of 2016, the number had risen to 61 percent.

SIDNEY — The battle against drug use in Shelby County is on.

A Community Conversation, hosted by the Shelby County Drug Task Force, will be held Sunday, Oct. 1, at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary of St. John’s Church, 120 W. Water St., Sidney. The meeting is free and open to the public.

“The task force formed in 2016,” said Margo O’Leary of Wilson Health, one of the task force partners. A member of the education and awareness committee, O’Leary said the group decided to hold community conversation meetings to educate the public.

“We will have information, statistics and a lot of discussion surrounding the issue,” said O’Leary. “We’ll have a variety of people as our panelists. Some are members of the task force, others are with law enforcement and counselors.”

Scott Barr, Shelby County United executive director, will serve as the moderator for the event. Pamelists include Sidney Police Chief Will Balling; Julie Clay, Shelby County Counseling Center; Shelby County Coroner Dr. A. David McDonald; Dr. Stephens Roberts, Wilson Health Emergency Department; Tom Bey, Shelby County Department of Job & Family Services; Cameron Haller, Sidney Fire Department; Steven Tostrick, Shelby County Health Department; and Shelby County Sheriff John Lenhart.

O’Leary said the panel held a dry run this past week.

“We had a group of volunteeres who sat with us,” said O’Leary. “They came in with a different perception than what they left with. They told us their eyes had been opened in terms of what we’re seeing locally.”

The meeting, she said, is the first step in educating the community.

“We all know someone who is affected by drugs,” said O’Leary. “This is the first tep in bringing education to our community. If you attend the community conversation you are going to be informed. We’ll give out information about resources that are available in the area. There are people who know how to help and they will be available to you.”

Task force partners include Bridges Community action Partnership, city of Sidney, city of Sidney Councilman, Council on Rural Services, Family and Children First Council, Metropolitan Housing, Midwest Regional Educational Service Center and Shelby County Junvenile Court, Ohio Highway Patrol Post commander, Samaritan Works, Shelby County Adult Probation, Shelby County Board of DD, Shelby County CASA, Shelby County Commissioners, Shelby County Cousneling Services, Shelby County Health Department, Shelby County Job & Family Serevics, Shelby County Proscuector, Shelby County Sheriff’s Office, Shelby County United Way, Sidney Fire Department, Sidney Police Department, Tr County Board of Recovery, Anna Police chief, Botkins police chief, Fort Loramie police chief, Jackson Center police chief and Wilson Health.

Community meeting to discuss drug crisis

By Melanie Speicher

mspeicher@sidneydailynews.com

Did you know?

According to the Shelby County Task Force annual report released for 2016:

• The Wilson Health Birthing Center had 34 babies born whose mothers had a positive drug test during their pregnancy. Seven tested positive for heroin. Babies born at Wilson Health exposed to heroin are transferred to Dayton Children’s medical center for further treatment.

• Naloxone or Narcan is a pharmaceutical drug that blocks or reverses the effects of opioid medication. In 2016, the Sidney Fire Department administered 171 doses; Wilson Health emergency room administered 80 doses; Sidney Police administered three doses and Fort Loramie Police administered one dose. In 2015, Sidney Fire administered 78 doses while Wilson Health ER administered 33 doses.

• Sidney Police completed 142 reports that included a drug code. There were 52 adults and 12 juveniles charged with a drug violation. The department presented 106 individuals to the grand jury for a drug violation with 234 separate drug charges presented to the grand jury. Twenty-three individuals contacted the department for help for themselves or a family member.

• The Shelby County Juvenile Court processed 62 cases for prohibition and drug abuse.

• The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office reports 161 inmates received substance abuse and/or mental health counseling. Forty inmates were referred to the Vivitrol program. There were 152 inmates set up on withdrawal protocol. Two inmates were HIV positive and five inmates were pregnant and addicted to drugs. The office completed 85 reports that included a drug code. Sixty-two adults were charged with a drug violation. Six adults were charged for cultivation or manufacturing drugs. Two juveniles were charge with a drug violation. Eight adults were arrested for trafficking in heroin. Four adults were arrested for possession of heroin. Fifty-four cases were presented to the grand jury for a drug violation. Twelve cases were presented to the grand jury for illegal conveyance of drugs into a detention facility. There were 104 separate drug charges presented to the grand jury.

• The Shelby County Health Department condemned one home due to methamphetamines. There were 10 overdose fatalities in 2016; nine in 2015.

• The Shelby County Counseling Center had 514 clients with a drug or alcohol assessment. Seventy-six clients (repeat) had an updated drug and alcohol assessment. Twenty-four clients that started during the year were successfully participating in the Vivitrol program at the end of 2016.

• In 2016, 229 people inquired about Samaritan Works and space availability. Nine men and 14 women were served. Seven of eight graduates were successful and sober at the end of the year. Four residents left the program early and are in stable recovery.

• The Shelby County Prosecutor dealt with 314 indictments and 689 charges filed. Of the charges filed, 382 were directly related to drugs and another 572 charges were directly or indirectly related to drugs. In 2016, 83 percent of all charges were directly or indirectly related to drugs.

• Tri County Board of Recovery and Mental Health provides funding for inpatient treatment at NOVA Behavioral Health in Dayton. Fifty-four Shelby County residents were referred to NOVA. Thirty-three of the referrals were for heroin and 21 were for all other substances. There were 31 people admitted with 18 of them for heroin.

• Troopers from the Piqua Post of the Ohio Highway Patrol initiated 167 drug arrests in 2016. Forty-six were felony drug arrests. In 2016, Shelby County had eight traffic fatalities with 38 percent impairment. Troopers made 417 impaired driving arrests.

• Job & Family Services reported that 22 our of 36 child care cases were placed due to opiates in the home. Nine out of 21 children were placed in foster care because of drugs in the home. Twenty-nine out of 37 children were placed with alternative family care due to opiates in the home. For the past two years, 50 percent of all placements were due to opiates. At the en of 2016, the number had risen to 61 percent.

Reach the writer at 937-538-4822.

Reach the writer at 937-538-4822.