Husted honors Midmark for STEMM work


VERSAILLES — Midmark Corp. has been honored by Secretary of State Jon Husted’s office for their work with the Ohio STEMM program.

As part of the Ohio Business Profile Program, Husted has declared August as STEMM in Ohio Month. STEMM stands for science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine. Midmark Corp. was selected as a featured business in the Ohio Business Profile Program for August.

Elaine Herrick, field representative for Husted’s office, presented a certificate to Midmark Corp. Monday for their accomplishments with the STEMM program.

“This certificate of commendation is tendered on behalf of the people of the state of Ohio as a small token of their gratitude and sincere admiration for the exemplary work of Midmark Corp. and its outstanding employees,” Herrick read from the certificate signed by Husted. “Midmark Corp. is an important member of Ohio’s STEMM community and has achieved great success by focusing on quality and the people they serve. This recognition and the accomplishments of Midmark Corp. is an inspiration to others for what they can achieve with a similar attitude, commitment and hard work.”

Herrick read portions of the submission Midmark presented for their selection in the Ohio Business Profile Program.

Dr. Thomas Schwieterman, Midmark’s vice president of clinical affairs and chief medical officer, also serves as the chairman of the state of Ohio’s STEMM School Committee.

“It’s amazing the amount of work being done at the school level — whether is public or parochial schools,” said Schwieterman. “Businesses have voluntarily helped with the STEMM schools. Businesses need to reach out to the schools.”

As technology advances, said Schwieterman, the need for better educated and trained students is more important for local businesses.

“The schools and the JVS’s will prepare the students,” said Schwieterman. “We need staff at all levels. Next year, we’ll bee opening a new technology center. We’ll be finding more solutions to help health care officials.”

Sue Hulsmeyer, senior director of the human resource department, said a co-op program was started at the company in 2013 with six co-op students.

“We had 28 co-ops last summer,” said Hulsmeyer. “We have 16 this fall. We’ve hired 14 or 15 since we started the co-op program.”

Hulsmeyer said the co-op program gives the “college student a long interview process with the co-op program.”

Midmark, she said, is also working with a Workforce Development program with the high schools in Darke County.

“If you a college graduate, we’ve got jobs for you,” said Hulsmeyer. “If you’re a high school graduate, we’ve got jobs for you.”

The company, she said, will also help employees got to college to further their education.

Schwieterman said the state STEMM committee has formed a panel to create new innovative ways where businesses can contribute to the STEMM program through their local schools.

“We’ve told them there’s no rule book for them to go by,” said Schwieterman.

The goal, he said, is for businesses to tell the school systems what they need in the way of training and education for future employees.

“In Europe,” said Schwieterman, “businesses design models which meet their needs (in workforce). I think we’ll be moving toward this also.”

He said Honda is creating specific programs to meet their company’s needs.

Schwieterman said the company has hired 75 new employees in 2017.

“We are competing with Honda and Emerson for employees,” said Schwieterman.

Schwieterman said only “degree-awarding schools” can be designated as a STEMM school. Because JVS and career center schools work hand-in-hand with their district’s home schools and don’t award diplomas, they cannot be STEMM schools.

“We’re working aggressively with the JVS to change this,” said Schwieterman. “This isn’t an effective way to designate STEMM schools.

Midmark Corp. is a leading provider of medical, dental and veterinary equipment and technologies.

“Midmark plays an important role in developing innovative products and solutions for healthcare providers. In many ways, our teammates exhibit perhaps one of the purest examples of how a STEMM education is being utilized to solve complex problems,” said Schwieterman.

As Midmark grows and extends beyond equipment and into a company that is creating advanced solutions for disease management, its local talent needs for STEMM will only grow. The company has every intention to continue to embolden local support of STEMM programming in local schools. Through its workforce development program, the company partners with several local high schools in Darke County.

Midmark also offers a four-year, $20,000 college scholarship for a local student pursuing a degree in a technical field, which includes co-op experience as well as a full-time job opportunity after graduation. The company hires several co-ops each term in electrical, computer, mechanical and biomedical disciplines.

In May, Midmark announced the construction of a technology center on its Versailles, Ohio, campus to facilitate the company’s recent and future growth and strengthen its new product development process and technological capabilities. The company is currently in the initial phases of the project with the goal of breaking ground late in the year or beginning of 2018.

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Dr. Thomas Schwieterman, Midmark Corp. vice president of clinical affairs and chief medical officer, shows Elaine Herrick, field representative for Secretary of State Jon Husted’s office, an IQ Vitals machine which Midmark created. Midmark is one of August’s featured businesses for the Ohio Business Profile Program sponsored by Husted’s office. The company was recognized for their work in STEMM, which focuses on science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).
http://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2017/08/web1_DSCF6071.jpgDr. Thomas Schwieterman, Midmark Corp. vice president of clinical affairs and chief medical officer, shows Elaine Herrick, field representative for Secretary of State Jon Husted’s office, an IQ Vitals machine which Midmark created. Midmark is one of August’s featured businesses for the Ohio Business Profile Program sponsored by Husted’s office. The company was recognized for their work in STEMM, which focuses on science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM). Melanie Speicher | Sidney Daily News

Midmark Corp. employees gather around Elaine Herrick, field representative for Secretary of State Jon Husted’s office Monday when she presented them a certificate highlighting their accomplishments in the STEMM program. Pictured, left to right are Monique McGlinch, vice president, information technology and project management office; Bethany Menke, senior human resources generalist; Andy Knapke, design engineer; Sue Hulsmeyer, senior director, human resources; Elaine Herrick of the Ohio Secretary of State’s Office; Dr. Tom Schwieterman, vice president clinical affairs and chief medical officer; Ryan Tyler, director, global sourcing; and Mark Oldiges, director, manufacturing.
http://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2017/08/web1_DSCF6064.jpgMidmark Corp. employees gather around Elaine Herrick, field representative for Secretary of State Jon Husted’s office Monday when she presented them a certificate highlighting their accomplishments in the STEMM program. Pictured, left to right are Monique McGlinch, vice president, information technology and project management office; Bethany Menke, senior human resources generalist; Andy Knapke, design engineer; Sue Hulsmeyer, senior director, human resources; Elaine Herrick of the Ohio Secretary of State’s Office; Dr. Tom Schwieterman, vice president clinical affairs and chief medical officer; Ryan Tyler, director, global sourcing; and Mark Oldiges, director, manufacturing. Melanie Speicher | Sidney Daily News

By Melanie Speicher

mspeicher@sidneydailynews.com

Reach the writer at 937-538-4822.