Out of the past


Out of the past



100 years

Nov. 12, 1915

The judges in the country-wide Edison Week window display contest have decided the first prize a tie between the Thedieck Department Store Co. of Sidney and a Morehouse and Martens Company of Columbus, and the prize money will be equally divided. Frank Rock was the trimmer of the prize window in this city. He enjoys an enviable reputation as a display man and the windows of the new Thedieck Store afford an excellent field for his natural ability.

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Wesley Gross, of near Quincy, was attacked by a mad hog on the farm near his home early this morning. He was knocked down and bitten about the legs, stomach and other parts of the body before he was rescued. Physicians immediately called to attend him, report that his condition is serious.

75 years

Nov. 12, 1940

Local law enforcement officials today were seeking some trace of the “gentleman” kidnapper who forced Miss Lelah Stahl, school teacher at the Orange Township School, to accompany him to Eldean last night after robbing her of $2.03. The man had apparently hidden in the rear seat of her car while it was parked on West Court Street near the Central Hotel. On reaching Eldean, where he was supposed to meet a buddy, the man turned Miss Stahl’s car around for her and then suggested that she not report the episode to police until morning. The victim said her abductor was a gentleman all during the ride. He kept his hat well pulled down and Miss Stahl was not able to get a good look at his face to furnish police with a description.

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History repeated for Rev. and Mrs. R. Wobus at a reception held last evening in the social rooms of St. Paul’s Church. The dinner was followed by an informal program during which the honored guests, assisted by Mrs. A.R. Friedman, reenacted the scene at the original reception given 30 years ago in welcoming the new pastor and his wife. There are 37 of the members on the church roll today that were there when Rev. and Mr. Wobus came to Sidney.

50 years

Nov. 12, 1965

“We just went to bed to get a good night’s sleep.” This was the comment of J. Oliver Amos, publisher of the Sidney Daily News, this morning on the blackout throughout the eastern states last night. Amos is in New York City, attending sessions of the American Press Institute seminar at Columbia University. Mrs. Raymond (Janet) Lipicky of Rochester, N.Y., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orville Eisenhut, Sidney, was also among the thousands stranded in New York City by the power failure. Mrs. Lipicky was in the Pan American building working as a student for the Rochester Institute of technology in photography. She told her mother by telephone this morning that she and the rest of the students left the building and began to make their way back to the Statler-Hilton Hotel where they were staying, taking pictures on the way.

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In light of the ten hour power blackout of the northeastern section of the nation last night, local residents today were recalling a similar experience that affected this area the night of December 13, 1960. On that occasion, a major portion of the 24 county area served by Dayton Power and Light Company was plunged into darkness when a broken 69,000 volt line knocked out the company’s system. George Tilton, northern division manager for DP & L said this morning, “It certainly shows that things like this can happen regardless of all the precautions, mechanical procedures and technical know-how employed to prevent them.”

25 years

Nov. 12, 1990

It was a tragic fire that also produced a real hero. The fire destroyed a home at 1662 Hardin-Wapak Road. Two children inside never made it out and died of smoke inhalation. Their mother was able to escape. Larry Burke was driving by when he noticed the fire. He tried to enter the home to save the girls but was unable to do so. Burke was injured and treated. He told investigators on the scene his own home had been destroyed by fire several years ago. Deputy Ken Pirics handled the case for the Sheriff’s Department.

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Shelby County has a real blacksmith. John Burris is a machinist by day and a blacksmith by night. Burris, who works at Leroi, fell in love with blacksmithing about 11 years ago. He sees similarities in the two vocations. He commented, “The first Ford Model T car was hammered out in a blacksmith’s shop.” Burris makes and sells various decorative iron items.

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Out of the past

These news items from past issues of the Sidney Daily News are compiled by the Shelby County Historical Society (498-1653) as a public service to the community. Local history on the Internet! www.shelbycountyhistory.org

These news items from past issues of the Sidney Daily News are compiled by the Shelby County Historical Society (498-1653) as a public service to the community. Local history on the Internet! www.shelbycountyhistory.org