Out of the past


125 Years

March 24, 1893

The gas well at the Blumehorst farm near Kettlersville was put down to the depth of 1,200 feet and of sufficient depth to test the productiveness of the Trenton rock. No gas was found. Oil raised in the well to the height of 100 feet.

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It is pleasant to be able to prove that spring is here. The almanac, which no one ever disputes, says the season commenced at eight minutes after three o’clock this morning.

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Dr. Charles L. Yakey, of this city, will graduate from Cleveland Medical College tomorrow. The commencement exercises of the college will be held in Case hall in the city of Cleveland. There are 30 members in his class.

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Yesterday noon a log barn belonging to George Martin at Rhine was destroyed by fire. All the contents except his horses were lost in the blaze. The loss is estimated at $500 with only a small amount of insurance on the building.

100 Years

March 24, 1918

Temporary greens are being made at the country club and members can now play at any time. Players are requested not to play the regular greens as they are now under repair. Other improvements are being made at the country club grounds and a very successful season in being looked forward to.

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Postmaster Val Lee reports that Russia continues to lead the post offices in the county in the competition on the sale of War Savings stamps. Through last night, Russia reports sales totaling $5,013; Anna, second with $2,793; Jackson Center, third, with $1,628, and Botkins, fourth, with $1,175. All other offices are below $300 in sales.

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A large crowd was on hand at the Big Four station last evening, when the westbound train arrived at 9:08. The occasion was the departure of Arnold Smith and Rauth Bush for Kelley Field in San Antonio, Tex.

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Misses Margaret Quinlisk and Mildred Ginn were advised today of their appointments as index and catalogue clerks in the Bureau of War Risk Insurance in Washington, D.C. No date was given when they will be called for service.

75 Years

March 24, 1943

Work of clearing up the wreckage of freight cars on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad just south of Sidney was proceeding apace today and train schedules were resumed at noon after all-night work in the rain by maintenance crews. A total of 20 cars went off the track late yesterday afternoon west of Graceland cemetery. Cause of the wreck had not been determined.

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The Miami river was rising steadily today as a result of the constant rain of the last 18 hours and at noon today stood almost six feet above normal on the river gauge at the North street bridge. The Ohio river was expected to reach flood stage at Cincinnati sometime tomorrow.

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Miss Betty Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lierman Smith, 311 South Main avenue, has been inducted into the WAVES, and is home on leave awaiting call to one of the three naval training centers for the women’s group.

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A warning that any motorist caught driving over 35 miles per hour in Sidney will be cited to the county ration board for revocation of his gasoline book was issued today by Chief of Police O’Leary.

50 Years

March 24, 1968

Mrs. Ruth Linker of 307 East Ruth street, Sidney, didn’t sign up during the past week for the Lucky Barrel prize, so she could not claim the $600 award when her name was drawn on Tuesday at Dorsey’s market. The prize remains at $600 and the barrel is now at Kaufman’s store.

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Congressman William McCulloch today announced the nomination of Michael L. Ball, a senior at Sidney High School, as an alternate appointee to the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. One of nine alternates to two principal appointments, Ball is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Ball, 402 Monterey drive, Sidney.

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Tuesday’s 73-degree temperature reading was the highest for a March 19th since Dave Fette, U.S. Weather Bureau observer at Sidney, began keeping records ten years ago. Fette said the area has received .89 inches of rain in March, or 1.35 inches below normal thus far for the month. He has recorded just 3.37 inches of rainfall for the entire year, or 4 inches less than normal.

25 Years

March 24, 1993

The newly-reorganized Shelby County Historical Society is making a gift. In its location on Brooklyn Avenue, paintings of I.H. Thedieck and his wife were located. Mr. Thedieck founded Monarch Machine Tool Co. in 1909. The historical society made the gift to Bob Sievert, president of Monarch. Society members thought the paintings were best kept by Monarch. Bob Sievert said, “I will make certain they hang in a place of honor in the board room.”

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There was an explosion at Plant 2 of the Stolle Corporation yesterday. Four employees were injured. The explosion occurred in the polishing room and was thought to have been caused by dust. All of the men were treated and released. John Lefevre indicated operations will soon be back to normal.

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These news items from past issues of the Sidney Daily News are compiled by the Shelby County Historical Society (937-498-1653) as a public service to the community. Local history on the Internet! www.shelbycountyhistory.org

These news items from past issues of the Sidney Daily News are compiled by the Shelby County Historical Society (937-498-1653) as a public service to the community. Local history on the Internet! www.shelbycountyhistory.org