Keeping the corn well fed


Patrick Knouff, of Fort Loramie, injects anhydrous ammonia into a field of corn along state Route 47 just west of Sidney Tuesday, June 5. The anhydrous ammonia is cooled into a liquid for injecting. A small amount escapes as a gas in the process of putting it into the ground. Knouff said it has been a “good start to the season, good stands. We’ll see what Mother Nature brings forth as the season progresses.” Anhydrous ammonia is used as a nitrogen fertilizer for the plants. Knouff also mixes in a nitrogen inhibitor which slows down or delays the nitrification process, thereby decreasing the possibility that large losses of nitrate will occur before the fertilizer nitrogen is taken up by plants.

Patrick Knouff, of Fort Loramie, injects anhydrous ammonia into a field of corn along state Route 47 just west of Sidney Tuesday, June 5. The anhydrous ammonia is cooled into a liquid for injecting. A small amount escapes as a gas in the process of putting it into the ground. Knouff said it has been a “good start to the season, good stands. We’ll see what Mother Nature brings forth as the season progresses.” Anhydrous ammonia is used as a nitrogen fertilizer for the plants. Knouff also mixes in a nitrogen inhibitor which slows down or delays the nitrification process, thereby decreasing the possibility that large losses of nitrate will occur before the fertilizer nitrogen is taken up by plants.


Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News

Patrick Knouff, of Fort Loramie, injects anhydrous ammonia into a field of corn along state Route 47 just west of Sidney Tuesday, June 5. The anhydrous ammonia is cooled into a liquid for injecting. A small amount escapes as a gas in the process of putting it into the ground. Knouff said it has been a “good start to the season, good stands. We’ll see what Mother Nature brings forth as the season progresses.” Anhydrous ammonia is used as a nitrogen fertilizer for the plants. Knouff also mixes in a nitrogen inhibitor which slows down or delays the nitrification process, thereby decreasing the possibility that large losses of nitrate will occur before the fertilizer nitrogen is taken up by plants.

Patrick Knouff, of Fort Loramie, injects anhydrous ammonia into a field of corn along state Route 47 just west of Sidney Tuesday, June 5. The anhydrous ammonia is cooled into a liquid for injecting. A small amount escapes as a gas in the process of putting it into the ground. Knouff said it has been a “good start to the season, good stands. We’ll see what Mother Nature brings forth as the season progresses.” Anhydrous ammonia is used as a nitrogen fertilizer for the plants. Knouff also mixes in a nitrogen inhibitor which slows down or delays the nitrification process, thereby decreasing the possibility that large losses of nitrate will occur before the fertilizer nitrogen is taken up by plants.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2018/06/web1_SDN060618Fertilizer-1.jpgPatrick Knouff, of Fort Loramie, injects anhydrous ammonia into a field of corn along state Route 47 just west of Sidney Tuesday, June 5. The anhydrous ammonia is cooled into a liquid for injecting. A small amount escapes as a gas in the process of putting it into the ground. Knouff said it has been a “good start to the season, good stands. We’ll see what Mother Nature brings forth as the season progresses.” Anhydrous ammonia is used as a nitrogen fertilizer for the plants. Knouff also mixes in a nitrogen inhibitor which slows down or delays the nitrification process, thereby decreasing the possibility that large losses of nitrate will occur before the fertilizer nitrogen is taken up by plants. Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU