Eighth-graders return home from DC


Robbie Lynch uses a pencil and paper to get an etching of a
persons name off of the Vietnam Memorial Wall Friday in Washington DC.

Robbie Lynch uses a pencil and paper to get an etching of a persons name off of the Vietnam Memorial Wall Friday in Washington DC.


Hope Alig (touching the wall) and Kaylee Cotterman take some time to reflect on the meaning "Freedom Is Not Free" at the Korean Memorial Friday afternoon.


Lindsay Gossard, Xandrea Locker, Hope Alig, Kaylee Cotterman, Katelyn Kinsella, Izabelle Oren, Leah Steinke, and Ella Audfderhaar take interest in a sheep at the Pioneer Farm on the Mount Vernon Estate of George Washington's home.


Botkins eighth-grade students look over part of the Gettysburg battlefield Saturday morning.


Botkins students get to see the view that Union Army's Chief Engineer, Brig. Gen. G.K. Warren saw from the rocks of Little Round Top in Gettysburg when he decided it was undefended from the approaching Confederate troops. General Warren quickly called for more troops which arrived just in time to meet the onrushing Confederates. This has been considered to be the turning point in the Civil War.


Ella Aufderhaar, Katelyn Kinsella and Leah Stenke look over a replica model of the Mt. Vernon Estate before going through the actual home of George Washington.


BOTKINS — The eighth-grade class at Botkins Local Schools has returned from a five-day trip to Washington, DC, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Before the trip began, the students spent time learning about the Declaration of Independence, The United States Constitution, and The Bill of Rights. The eighth-graders were challenged to find specific items in each of these documents in person. During this trip the class used the best of their time to take in as much of Washington DC and the history of our country as they could. From the first night of walking to 1600 Pennsylvania avenue to the White House and through the Navy Memorial.

Day 2 was filled with the history of the US government with a Capitol Tour of the House of Congress and even got the chance to sit in the galley of the US House of Representatives. The Library of Congress and National Archives filled their heads with facts and documents of the nation’s founding fathers. The Washington National Cathedral showed the beauty of architecture and brilliance from stained glassed windows. Martin Luther King, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Thomas Jefferson Memorials help them realize how much each of us can make a difference. Iwo Jima gives us a showing of determination of the Marines.

Day 3 begins with the Newseum showing the importance of freedom of the press and how it can help shape current events. Overwhelmed with the collections of the Smithsonian Museums of Air & Space, Natural History, and American History, the students then head to Arlington National Cemetery. Here the student learn the meaning of sacrifice and honor. From meeting veterans from Alaska, to laying a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier they can understand the solitude of the Arlington National Cemetery. They conclude with visits to the 911 Pentagon Memorial and the Air Force Memorial.

Day 4 begins with a trip to Mt. Vernon. They learned how George Washington lived and how he kept expanding the estate to help house all of the guest that would come to visit. Then it was off the to Lincoln, Korean, and Vietnam Memorials. Here the students learn some of the names and symbols of the price of war. The Holocaust and World War II Memorials reminds the students of the horrors of war.

Day 5 concludes with at trip to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The eighth-graders get the chance to walk the actual civil war battlefield. They learned about the struggles of the soldiers of that time and how most died from infection and sickness from the battle. Experienced the geography of the land and importance of the Union Army’s victory.

Robbie Lynch uses a pencil and paper to get an etching of a
persons name off of the Vietnam Memorial Wall Friday in Washington DC.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2018/10/web1_DSC_4138.jpgRobbie Lynch uses a pencil and paper to get an etching of a
persons name off of the Vietnam Memorial Wall Friday in Washington DC.

Hope Alig (touching the wall) and Kaylee Cotterman take some time to reflect on the meaning "Freedom Is Not Free" at the Korean Memorial Friday afternoon.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2018/10/web1_DSC_4185.jpgHope Alig (touching the wall) and Kaylee Cotterman take some time to reflect on the meaning "Freedom Is Not Free" at the Korean Memorial Friday afternoon.

Lindsay Gossard, Xandrea Locker, Hope Alig, Kaylee Cotterman, Katelyn Kinsella, Izabelle Oren, Leah Steinke, and Ella Audfderhaar take interest in a sheep at the Pioneer Farm on the Mount Vernon Estate of George Washington’s home.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2018/10/web1_DSC_4083.jpgLindsay Gossard, Xandrea Locker, Hope Alig, Kaylee Cotterman, Katelyn Kinsella, Izabelle Oren, Leah Steinke, and Ella Audfderhaar take interest in a sheep at the Pioneer Farm on the Mount Vernon Estate of George Washington’s home.

Botkins eighth-grade students look over part of the Gettysburg battlefield
Saturday morning.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2018/10/web1_DSC_4261.jpgBotkins eighth-grade students look over part of the Gettysburg battlefield
Saturday morning.

Botkins students get to see the view that Union Army’s Chief Engineer, Brig. Gen. G.K. Warren saw from the rocks of Little Round Top in Gettysburg when he decided it was undefended from the approaching Confederate troops. General Warren quickly called for more troops which arrived just in time to meet the onrushing Confederates. This has been considered to be the turning point in the Civil War.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2018/10/web1_DSC_4290.jpgBotkins students get to see the view that Union Army’s Chief Engineer, Brig. Gen. G.K. Warren saw from the rocks of Little Round Top in Gettysburg when he decided it was undefended from the approaching Confederate troops. General Warren quickly called for more troops which arrived just in time to meet the onrushing Confederates. This has been considered to be the turning point in the Civil War.

Ella Aufderhaar, Katelyn Kinsella and Leah Stenke look over a replica model of the Mt. Vernon Estate before going through the actual home of George Washington.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2018/10/web1_DSC_3987new.jpgElla Aufderhaar, Katelyn Kinsella and Leah Stenke look over a replica model of the Mt. Vernon Estate before going through the actual home of George Washington.