Former federal agent helps prepare schools for active shooter attacks


Kevin Stanley, an intervention specialist and transportation supervisor, left, and Misty Trask, a janitor, right, respond during advanced level active shooter preparedness training for Arcanum-Butler Local Schools on Feb. 19. Playing a victim in the scenario is Collin Habel, a member of the Sidney Fire Department.

Kevin Stanley, an intervention specialist and transportation supervisor, left, and Misty Trask, a janitor, right, respond during advanced level active shooter preparedness training for Arcanum-Butler Local Schools on Feb. 19. Playing a victim in the scenario is Collin Habel, a member of the Sidney Fire Department.


Courtesy photo

ARCANUM – A former federal agent who served in Iraq and Afghanistan is helping schools, law enforcement and emergency responders train in active shooter response and tactical medicine.

The Pohl Group provided advanced level active shooter preparedness training for Arcanum-Butler Local Schools on Feb. 19.

The training was the second in a series of courses provided by The Pohl Group that Arcanum has received in less than a year. District leadership identified the training as a key component of their overall strategy to keep the school’s children safe.

“I’ve seen first-hand the benefits of tactical medicine training and wanted to bring this U.S. military developed, battlefield-proven technology to our communities to help keep our children safe,” said Mark Pohl, founder and president of The Pohl Group.

In addition to being a former federal agent, Pohl is a trained Department of Homeland Security instructor for active shooter response and tactical medicine. He’s also a global war on terror medal recipient.

“The active shooter threat today presents a mirror image of the problem the military faced during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: Victims must wait for treatment by medical professionals when they could be receiving lifesaving treatment immediately from trained civilians,” said Pohl, who also has provided training to the Miami County Sheriff’s Office and other groups.

Tactical medicine was developed by the U.S. military to bridge the gap in time between traumatic injury and treatment by medical professionals, Pohl said.

“Tactical medicine training provides a real, tangible civilian medical capability to keep victims of trauma alive until EMS professionals can intervene,” he said. “It has been proven to reduce fatalities by 50 percent and is more effective at saving lives than CPR.

“We focus our training on empowering people and inspiring them to act through training and confidence. Our training provides the same training and equipment provided to U.S. government agencies. Every student also receives a high-value personal trauma kit that gives them the capability to help others, whether the injury resulted from an active threat attack, car accident or farm injury.”

John Stephens, the superintendent at Arcanum, said, “The training provided by Mark and The Pohl Group has been the best training the district has had pertaining to safety preparedness. Instead of feeling helpless, staff members now feel empowered. I would recommend all schools consider inviting The Pohl Group to provide the training. His team’s vast experience and scenario-based training provides another layer of preparedness.”

More information about The Pohl Group and its training can be found at www.thepohlgroup.com.

Kevin Stanley, an intervention specialist and transportation supervisor, left, and Misty Trask, a janitor, right, respond during advanced level active shooter preparedness training for Arcanum-Butler Local Schools on Feb. 19. Playing a victim in the scenario is Collin Habel, a member of the Sidney Fire Department.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2020/04/web1_IMG_6541.jpgKevin Stanley, an intervention specialist and transportation supervisor, left, and Misty Trask, a janitor, right, respond during advanced level active shooter preparedness training for Arcanum-Butler Local Schools on Feb. 19. Playing a victim in the scenario is Collin Habel, a member of the Sidney Fire Department. Courtesy photo