Council waves noise ordinance for Civil War Living Weekend


By Sheryl Roadcap - [email protected]



SIDNEY — The city of Sidney is preparing for the upcoming September Civil War Living History Weekend by waving the prohibition of noise or firearm discharge during the event.

Sidney City Council adopted an ordinance Monday evening that will suspend the discharge of firearms and noise ordinances specifically during the Civil War Living History Weekend.

Monday, Sidney Parks and Recreation Director Duane Gaier brought back legislation for further consideration on the issue after the the Civil War Living Weekend’s planning committee at the Shelby County Historical Society had asked for consideration to suspend the discharge of firearms and noise ordinances for the weekend event. The noise and firearm discharge ordinance suspension would only apply to those associated with the event, Gaier noted. The event is scheduled to be held at Tawawa Park on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 17 and 18, 2022.

During a July City Council meeting, Gaier told council members the Sidney Recreation Board and Parks staff are aware of this request and support the temporary suspension of the noise and firearm discharge codified ordinances. The Sidney Recreation Board, at its June 6, 2022, meeting, to approved to suspend park open hours beginning Friday, Sept. 16, through Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022. Normal operating hours, allowing vehicular traffic, will resume on Monday, Sept. 19, 2022, at 10 a.m., he said.

Throughout both days, Union and Confederate troops will be skirmishing (or fighting) throughout the park, Gaier previously explained. Visitors will be reminded to stay clear of troops who are so engaged. During the staged battles, he said visitors will be asked to stay behind the caution tape for their protection and that of the re-enactors.

Visitors are welcome to stop by the encampments of both Union and Confederate re-enactors, Gaier said, and talk with them about the life of the common soldier during the War Between the States.

“Visitors should feel free to ask about the food they are eating, the weapons being used, drill, camp life and even tactics. There will be presentations on period medical procedures and an infantry band concert, along with live cannon fire and an opportunity to meet published authors and purchase their books,” Gaier noted.

In other business, the following five ordinance were introduced to council:

• To grant a municipal income tax job creation tax credit to Industrial Recyclers. Community Development Director Barbara Dulworth said Industrial Recyclers recently purchased the industrial property at 402 S. Kuther Road, formerly Ross Casting & Innovation, and intends to expand their current operations at 2640 Campbell Road to include an extrusion process of recycled materials in the newly purchased facility. Industrial Recyclers intends to create 30 new jobs at the Kuther Road site with an estimated annual payroll of $1.5 million, Dulworth said.

In this agreement, Industrial Recyclers agrees to maintain significant operations, jobs, and payroll for at least twice the number of years of the tax credit. The city will provide a job creation nonrefundable annual tax credit for a 7-year term, she said. This credit is calculated on 50% of the new employee’s Sidney income taxes withheld for tax years 2022 through 2028 for the company’s net profit return.

• To grant a municipal income tax job creation tax credit to P&THE Manufacturing LLC. Dulworth said P&THE Manufacturing LLC recently purchased the industrial property at 815 Oak Ave., formerly Ross Aluminum, and intends to expand the operations to fully utilize the manufacturing site. Ross Aluminum had been reducing operations and employees at the Oak Avenue location for several years, she noted, and at the time of acquisition, there were 49 employees, who will be retained. P&THE Manufacturing LLC intends to create 175 new jobs with an estimated annual payroll of over $6.9 million.

In this agreement, P&THE Manufacturing LLC agrees to maintain significant operations, jobs, and payroll for at least twice the number of years of the tax credit. Dulworth said the company is hoping to bring back previous employees of Ross Aluminum who have the technical expertise for the operations. The city would provide a job creation nonrefundable annual tax credit for a 7-year term. This credit is calculated on 50% of the new employee’s Sidney income taxes withheld for tax years 2025 through 2031 for the company’s net profit return.

• To assess the cost to demolish the single family structure at 536 S. Miami Ave, which had had a portion of the first floor collapsed into the basement in December 2021. Following an inspection, the structure was declared dangerous and the owner was notified that the dwelling must be razed or repaired by Jan. 22, 2022. The cost for the city for the demolition cost $11,100, and was completed April 2022.

• To levy 2022 curb and gutter assessments for the construction and replacement of certain described curb and gutters in the city of Sidney. Chad Arkenberg, engineering manager, said a city contractor completed the work for property owners who did not complete their own curb and gutter replacement during 2022. The city engineering department itemized these assessments and gave a list of property owners to the clerk of council on June 24. He told council notices of payment due will be sent to residents two weeks after the adoption of the ordinance. Property owners then will be given 60 days to pay the bill or have it placed on their property taxes over a five-year period through the Shelby County Auditor’s Office.

• To wave the collection of and forgiving certain “bad debt” owed to the city. Renee DuLaney, finance officer, said the outstanding invoices included in the ordinance are from June 2006 to September 2009 covering 82 transactions for a total of $5,348.06.

By Sheryl Roadcap

[email protected]