Tiffin man sentenced to prison on drug charges


By Charlotte Caldwell - [email protected]



SIDNEY — The Shelby County Common Pleas Court recently handed down several sentences for drug trafficking and possession, tampering with evidence and endangering children, among other charges.

Ryan D. Steward, 35, of Tiffin, was sentenced to 17 months in prison with three days of jail credit and discretionary post-release control of up to two years for attempted tampering with evidence, a fourth-degree felony, and the possession of drugs, a fifth-degree felony. Steward was indicted on the same charges as well as possessing criminal tools, a fifth-degree felony, for having Fentanyl and a bindle and hiding the drug on him. The criminal tools charge was dismissed.

Amoni Hassen Massey, 27, of Antioch, Tennessee, was sentenced to 90 days in the Shelby County Jail with 24 days of jail credit and must pay a fine of $300. This sentence is suspended on the condition that his fine and costs are paid within 60 days. The Anna Police Department was also authorized to destroy or dispose of a 9 mm Taurus PT 709 handgun. This was because of one charge of improper handling of a firearm in a motor vehicle, a first-degree misdemeanor. Massey was indicted on the same charge, a fourth-degree felony, for having a handgun within his reach inside of a motor vehicle.

Christopher D. Fry, 33, of Sidney, was sentenced to 12 months in prison with 46 days of jail credit and discretionary post-release control of up to two years for two charges of trafficking in drugs, fourth-degree felonies. Fry was indicted on four charges of trafficking in drugs, fourth and fifth-degree felonies, for knowingly selling or offering to sell marijuana — two of which occurred in the vicinity of a juvenile — but two charges were dismissed.

Ashley R. Schneider, 33, of Elida, was sentenced to 12 months in prison with seven days of jail credit and discretionary post-release control of up to two years for the aggravated possession of drugs, a third-degree felony, and possessing criminal tools, a fifth-degree felony. Schneider was indicted on the same charges as well as tampering with evidence and the illegal conveyance of a prohibited item onto the grounds of a detention facility, third-degree felonies, for having methamphetamine and a container and pipe to store and use it and placing the drug in a body cavity while entering the Shelby County Jail. Two charges were dismissed.

Daniel L. Hewitt, 41, of Houston, was sentenced to 12 months in prison with four days of jail credit and discretionary post-release control of up to two years for the attempted aggravated possession of drugs, a fourth-degree felony. Hewitt was indicted on the aggravated possession of drugs, a third-degree felony, and possessing criminal tools, a fifth-degree felony, for having methamphetamine and a pipe to use it. The criminal tools charge was dismissed.

Monique D. De La Rosa, 35, of Sidney, was sentenced to five years of community control with no days of jail credit and must successfully complete drug and alcohol counseling. She must also make regular restitution payments to Shelby County Job and Family Services with a total cost of $625.85. This was because of one charge of attempted illegal use of supplemental nutrition or WIC benefits, a fifth-degree felony. She was indicted on the same charge, a fourth-degree felony, for selling food assistance benefits (SNAP) to another totaling $625.84 over a period of two months.

Tyler A. Miranda, 31, of Sidney, was sentenced to five years of community control with no days of jail credit and must maintain employment and successfully complete the Thinking for a Change program and parenting classes. This was because of one charge of attempted endangering children, a fourth-degree felony. Miranda was indicted on the same charge, a third-degree felony, for failing to provide proper supervision to a two-year-old child causing the child to fall out of a second-story window and suffer serious physical harm.

Jonathan K. Johnson, 43, of Sidney, was sentenced to five years of community control with no days of jail credit and successful completion of the Thinking for a Change program for trafficking in drugs, a fifth-degree felony. Johnson was indicted on two charges of trafficking in drugs, fifth-degree felonies, for knowingly selling or offering to sell cocaine, but one charge was dismissed.

By Charlotte Caldwell

[email protected]

Reach the writer at 937-538-4824.

Reach the writer at 937-538-4824.