Tri-County Board seeks artists


Staff report



TROY — The Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services is seeking entries from local artists for its annual Art of Recovery showcase, as well as a first-time juried gallery exhibit to be displayed in the Art Gallery at Edison Community College in Piqua throughout the month of October.

Artists who have been affected personally, through a family member or friend, or anyone whose art reflects recovery from mental illness or addiction are invited to participate. Artists display works ranging from painting and drawing to sculpture, mixed media, crafts, photography and poetry. Artists typically reside in Darke, Miami or Shelby counties, although submissions from other counties are sometimes received. Many use their art to express personal journeys with recovery from mental illness and addiction, while others have been touched as family members, friends, advocates and service providers.

For the first time, select Art of Recovery works will be displayed in the Myers-Vacarro Gallery at Edison Community College. To be considered for the juried exhibit, artwork (photos of large pieces are acceptable) must be submitted to the Tri-County Board by Sept. 14. Artists must submit an entry form for each piece to be considered. The form and additional details are available at the Tri-County Board’s website, tcbmds.org/art. An artist’s statement must accompany each piece describing how the piece represents wellness, mental health or addiction recovery. Pieces may be representational or metaphorical, and do not need to be biographical in nature. All pieces selected for the gallery exhibit must be made available for display from Oct. 5 through Oct. 30.

“We are very excited that we are able to partner with Edison Community College for the October gallery exhibit,” said Brad Reed, director of community resource development for the Tri-County Board. “In past years, we’ve had the showcase just for the one night in conjunction with the board’s annual meeting. We have had some really beautiful and thought-provoking pieces and it seemed unfortunate that we were able to display them for just a few hours. (Edison Associate Professor of Fine Art) Greg Clem was kind enough to fit us into the schedule of gallery exhibits around our traditional October showcase date.”

Reed said that artworks submitted for the gallery exhibit will be juried and selected works will be on display for the month. Some of the pieces, with the artists’ permission, may be sent to smaller traveling exhibits at locations throughout Darke, Miami and Shelby counties for several months.

“It’s a great way to share the amazing artwork to a broader audience, and to promote the message of recovery and overcoming challenges of mental illness and addiction,” he said.

To be displayed in the open showcase, Oct. 21, artwork and submission forms must be received by Oct. 12.

Art may be in any medium, including but not limited to painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, needlework, crafts, instrumental music, poetry and mixed media. Artists may submit more than one piece for submission, and may elect to remain anonymous at the showcase. There is no fee to enter, and no prizes are awarded. For the gallery exhibit, three ribbons will be awarded. Best in Show will be determined by the judges, People’s Choice will be awarded based on popular vote, and the Director’s Award will be selected by Tri-County Board staff for the piece that best exemplifies wellness and recovery.

The Art of Recovery showcase aims to increase public awareness of mental illness and addiction issues in an effort to fight the stigma that so often accompanies these diseases.

The showcase and reception will be open to the public, Oct. 21 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the art gallery and adjacent lounge at Edison Community College. A brief award presentation will also take place.

For information, visit the website, email ReedB@tcbmds.org, or call 937-335-7727, ext. 209.

Staff report

This article was submitted by the Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services.

This article was submitted by the Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services.