Water trail gains national recognition


Great Miami River receives National Water Trail System designation

By Sheryl Roadcap - sroadcap@civitasmedia.com



Parks and Recreation Director Duane Gaier and Watershed Partnerships-Miami Conservancy Director Sarah Hippensteel-Hall present Sidney City Council with signs designating the Great Miami River Watershed Water Trail as a National Water Trail System. Sidney is part of the watershed water trail district.

Parks and Recreation Director Duane Gaier and Watershed Partnerships-Miami Conservancy Director Sarah Hippensteel-Hall present Sidney City Council with signs designating the Great Miami River Watershed Water Trail as a National Water Trail System. Sidney is part of the watershed water trail district.


SIDNEY — The city of Sidney has been honored for its commitment in keeping the Great Miami River sparkling through the years.

The Great Miami River Watershed Trail was recently named a National Water Trail System by the Secretary of the Interior in recognition of the National Parks Service’s 100th anniversary.

The national trail designation is “only one of 22 in the U.S., and (the only) one in Ohio” said Watershed Partnerships-Miami Conservancy District Manager Sarah Hippensteel-Hall at Monday evening’s Sidney City Council meeting.

“I’m here to thank Sidney for the leadership that you have shown over the last eight years; that your city staff and everyone have been participating in this partnership. Without your beautiful parks as a part of this package, the designation wouldn’t have been possible.”

Ohio’s water trail includes the Great Miami, Stillwater and Mad Rivers. Hippensteel-Hall, said only “the most special rivers in the country” are chosen to be apart of the National Water Trails based upon “the best parks, the best public access and the best fishing.”

“Our world-class network of national trails provides easily accessible places to enjoy exercise and connect with nature in both urban in both urban and rural areas while also boosting tourism and supporting economic opportunities in local communities across the country,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell in a statement.

Gaier said, “The national trail designation assures paddlers that the water trail incorporates best management practices in a variety of areas including trail design, maintenance, recreation, conservation and public information … The Great Miami River Watershed Trail boasts 291 miles of waterway accessible to recreational boaters, anglers and wildlife watchers.”

In a second presentation, council also heard utility billing payment options and bill delivery methods updates from Revenue Collections Manager Karen Berning.

Two ordinances were adopted by council on Paint the Town program’s revisions and the medical marijuana moratorium.

The Paint the Town ordinance was adopted by a 6-1 vote, with Councilman Darryl Thurber voting no.

Now any contributor who donates 3 percent of the city’s annual budget to the city’s Paint the Town program will “have a seat at the table” automatically becoming a committee member. Also, because of the potentially vast number of committee members, a provision was added to allow a minimum number of members be able to award a grant instead of the simple majority.

The medical marijuana moratorium ordinance of was unanimously adopted for a period of nine-months. According to Law Director Jeffrey Amick, the moratorium will “allow staff time to study the law and to determine if additional restrictions on the locations and number dispensaries be permitted for the community.”

Councilwoman Janet Born questioned Amick if council could extend the moratorium if they felt they needed more time. Amick said they would be able to do so in the future.

Councilman Steve Wagner thanked Amick for bringing the issue to council’s attention. Amick expressed appreciation and pointed out many other local communities are also instituting a six or nine month moratorium.

As apart of other business, council also approved two resolutions for the Norcold and Mees replat.

The resolution for the Norcold replat will take two lots and create two new lots at the southeast corner of Campbell Road and Kuther Road in the general industrial district. This replat will transfer a strip of land, approximately 160-feet-wide, from one property to another and to vacate utility easements along the lot line. Norcold has plans to add to their building on South Kuther Road, which was not allowed because it crossed the current property line.

The Mees replat will take two lots and create one new lot at 245 W. North St., in the multi-family residence district. The purpose of the replat is to combine the lots into one for the residential structure and accessory garage. According to Community Services Director Barbara Dulworth, the need for the replat came to light during the construction of a deck, which crossed the property line.

Parks and Recreation Director Duane Gaier and Watershed Partnerships-Miami Conservancy Director Sarah Hippensteel-Hall present Sidney City Council with signs designating the Great Miami River Watershed Water Trail as a National Water Trail System. Sidney is part of the watershed water trail district.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2016/08/web1_Water-Trail.jpgParks and Recreation Director Duane Gaier and Watershed Partnerships-Miami Conservancy Director Sarah Hippensteel-Hall present Sidney City Council with signs designating the Great Miami River Watershed Water Trail as a National Water Trail System. Sidney is part of the watershed water trail district.
Great Miami River receives National Water Trail System designation

By Sheryl Roadcap

sroadcap@civitasmedia.com

Reach the writer at 937-538-4823.

Reach the writer at 937-538-4823.