Lessons in gratitude


By Korah Hudson



Hudson

Hudson


My parents are my greatest inspirations and my biggest supporters. I can confidently say they have taught me just as much or even more than 12 years of school. They’ve taught me all the little things only a parent can teach like how to ride a bike without training wheels, how to tie your shoes, and how to do long division on my fourth-grade math homework. The most important lessons they have taught me are things that are less tangible. One of my largest goals in life is to have an impact on everyone I meet. I think my parents have paved the way for me to do so with some of the lessons they have taught me.

Number one: You must learn to forgive. Everyone has heard the saying “you can forgive but you can never forget.” This rings true for me. My parents believe in second chances and they have taught me to believe in second chances too. They have encouraged me to always look for the good in people even when I think I can’t find it. You have to start with the little things. Letting go and being able to forgive for little inconveniences will not make the more serious situations any easier to forgive. It just won’t. However, they have taught me that if I practice forgiveness in small moments I will have the strength to forgive in more serious situations. My parents are the most forgiving people I know. They forgive me everyday. They also forgive each other. They even forgive society even though nobody would really notice if they did or didn’t. Life is based around the connections you make with the people around you. If you are not able to forgive someone then you are not looking for the good in people, and if you aren’t looking for the good in people then the world is a dark and lonely place.

Number Two: Put others before yourself. You wouldn’t believe the amount of times my mom has cooked dinner and then has been the last one to eat. She always makes sure everybody in the house gets to eat before her. She tells me that when I have kids of my own I will understand. Now that I’ve grown and matured into a young woman I see what kind of mom she is and I want to be that kind of mom someday too. She consistently puts others before herself. I am not a parent yet, but I practice this in other ways. When I drop someone off I always wait until they get into their house before I drive away. I hold the door to the restaurant even when it’s -10 or 110 degrees outside because the person coming in might be just a little bit hungrier than me and I can wait a little longer.

Number Three: If you go to the Cincinnati Reds games you have to sit in the all-you-can eat seats, always. Pizza, pretzels, hot dogs, hamburgers, nachos…my parents always get the best seats.

Number Four: Your opinions are valuable. In middle school and in high school there are class discussions on current events or sometimes just random topics. In middle school, I never said a word. I kept my opinions to myself. Somebody would state their opinion, the class would murmur in agreement, and there was nothing else to be discussed. I often found that I didn’t agree with what was being discussed, but I couldn’t find the courage to speak my mind. By the time I entered high school I decided I would challenge myself to speak up and at least ask questions. My mother and father have taught me that God has given me a voice and that I should always use it. I put this advice into practice in high school. I am a senior now and speak my mind freely in class discussions and everywhere else. I have learned that the more I speak the deeper a discussion will move in all directions- which is what is best for everyone. My statements are valuable even if others don’t agree. I can speak on the most controversial topics with confidence.

Number Five: Toyota Camrys are the best cars (My parents would be so proud).

Number Six: Being different is cool. There are so many people in society who just fall in line with some things because “that’s what everyone else is doing.” I refuse to be that kind of person. My parents have shown me that my personality is unique and it’s okay if I don’t fall in line with everyone else. My parents are different from each other and from me. If the world was full of the same people with the same opinions, the same clothes, the same voices, and the same personality- this world would be such a boring place. I want this world to be colorful and bright and the people who make it that way are the people who step out of their comfort zones and go their own way.

Number Seven: It’s okay not to be okay. Being sad sometimes is normal and for the longest time I didn’t realize that. I would always put on a brave face because I didn’t want to inconvenience anyone with my emotions or my problems. I’ve learned from my parents that being upset isn’t a bad thing. It can be a good thing. You can talk out your problems rather than bottling them up and just waiting for the top to pop. Being upset can help you mature and grow as an individual if you are willing to reflect on it. I’ve watched my parents be upset over some little things and even big things too. I don’t judge them because they have taught me that being upset is temporary. Watching my parents be vulnerable has shown me that even the strongest of people can have bad days and still be okay. I have been able to teach this to some of my friends. When I’m feeling low I always tell somebody. Usually, they understand and we end up being strong for each other. My parents taught me this.

Number Eight: “I’m not your friend, I am your parent. I will stalk you, lecture you and drive you crazy. I will be your worst nightmare and hunt you down when you need to come home, because I love you.” Whenever I read this quote I just imagine my mom and dad saying it to me. It used to make me so angry I wanted to slam my door. But now as a senior in high school, I think I get it. My parents have so much unconditional love for me that they would rather hurt my feelings than watch me get hurt. I recognize that I was blessed with parents who provide for me, support me, and help me grow everyday. I hope other people my age can pause and really think about everything their parents have taught them. It takes years to shape a child into an adult. I feel like I hit the jackpot with the people God sent to shape me.

Hudson
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By Korah Hudson

Korah Hudson is the daughter of Kristy and Willie Hudson. She is a senior at Sidney High School. After graduating she plans to attend Bowling Green State University to major in Exercise Science and minor in Vocal Performance. She enjoys music, spending time with her friends and family, and shopping. She is looking forward to closing her chapter as a high school student with an unforgettable summer and starting a new chapter of her life as an adult.

Korah Hudson is the daughter of Kristy and Willie Hudson. She is a senior at Sidney High School. After graduating she plans to attend Bowling Green State University to major in Exercise Science and minor in Vocal Performance. She enjoys music, spending time with her friends and family, and shopping. She is looking forward to closing her chapter as a high school student with an unforgettable summer and starting a new chapter of her life as an adult.