Weigh things out with a scale of love


Weigh things out with a scale of love

By Benjamin Budde - Contributing columnist



There are all different kinds of scales: scales on the skin of an animal to a seemingly never-ending scales in music. A scale to understand the weight of something or someone. What is interesting is they all seem to have a relation to measurements or covering space and one of the most common scales we use today is to weigh ourselves. Why do we do this? To know the process of our weight, if it’s less or more. The scale gives us a reference point to judge or reason if we need to lose weight or not.

Have you ever thought about how we weigh things out spirituality or morally? With our ears and our eyes! An old scale has two plates to weigh things out as if the vision of the old scale came from the ear and eye. In the book of Acts 9:18 “Immediately there fell from his eyes something like scales, and he received his sight at once.” In this verse, it says something like scales fell from Paul’s eyes. This word scales, in the Greek, is lepis, which means a flake. In the Webster dictionary, it means a pan or tray of a balance; an instrument for weighing. How do we weigh situations out in our lives with our eyes and ears? To reason and judge what is safe and best not only for ourselves but for others also.

The eye is the window to the world that gives us our mind frame. Jesus said if our eye is good our whole body will be filled with light, but if the eye is bad the whole body will be filled with darkness (Matthew 6:22-23). How can we weigh out our perspective? Is it light or darkness, love or hate? In Proverbs 11:1 it says, The Lord detests dishonest scales, but accurate weights find favor with him. Before Paul became a Christian, he was condemning and persecuting them even to the point of death! We need to realize that “(For) God did not send his Son ( Jesus) into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.” (John 3:17) Weigh things out with a scale of love and not hate with a strong hand and a loving heart to help our neighbor to see the light of Christ, not to push them deeper into darkness! That is why Jesus said, “For I tell you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven.” Matthew 5:20

The Scribes and Pharisees had the law down in their mind — it wasn’t in their heart to love their neighbor as themselves. If so, they would have never killed Jesus! There was no compassion, no mercy or love! Which I believe the full fulfillment of its purest form comes from a personal relationship with Christ Jesus and that is why so many are martyrs. To judge others with that love that Jesus showed us, when we were lost, hurting and mean. When we saw the love of Christ, we knew there was wrong. But we couldn’t see what it was or is.

The love of Christ came and shined the light into our heart and gave us the strength to change — to walk toward the light and not to turn our back to it! This righteousness is completely believing in Jesus (Romans 4:20-21). This is Paul’s testimony to King Agrippa that Jesus opened his eyes. The condemnable scales of hate fell off in Acts 26:18 to open their eyes, to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and an inheritance among those who are sanctified by faith in Me (Jesus). If you feel you have eyes, but you cannot see, pray that the scales of being judgmental will fall off and with it the weight of hate and offense will drop off by the forgiveness of Jesus Christ. Reading the Holy Bible and doing what it states will be like awakening from a restless night, for Christ will have given you peace and a heart of light to weigh life situations out in love.

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Weigh things out with a scale of love

By Benjamin Budde

Contributing columnist

The writer is a husband, father, preacher, writer, artist, musician and songwriter. Ben and his wife, Missy, reside with their three sons in St. Marys.

The writer is a husband, father, preacher, writer, artist, musician and songwriter. Ben and his wife, Missy, reside with their three sons in St. Marys.

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