Remembering Sept. 11


By Haley Norris - Guest columnist



The biggest threat told today is racism and racial profiling but, despite those things, the biggest one is terrorism.

Terrorism is a huge problem in the world today and it has been for years. The biggest terrorist act in history other than Pearl Harbor was the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

Chris Bell said, “On 11 Sept. 2001, four passenger planes were hijacked by radical Islamist terrorists — almost 3,000 people were killed as the aircraft were flown into the World Trade Centre, the Pentagon and a Pennsylvania field.”

Minutes after the attacks happened one may remember hugging strangers, falling to your knees or standing there in shock not knowing what is going to happen next. Others were watching as the attacks went on wondering if their loved ones would make it home safely. It was clear that on that September day, that this was the worst attack since pearl harbor, and that America was about to change in many ways.

As most people remember the attacks of Sept. 11, killed nearly 3,000 people, and left approximately 6,000 injured. Many people who were alive during the era of Sept. 11, will remember how security was and how lenient the nation was compared to today’s security. Airport security did not take hours on end to get through when you went before Sept. 11, took place, and just about anybody could get into the United States compared to how strict the laws and security is now. The changes of security is fuelled by the spread of radical philosophies that moved into the West and the increase of technology that gives those wanting to attack us a greater chance to do so. Since Sept. 11, the United States has become more political and surround the nation solely on politics. An outcome of this happening is that the US is less confident about the roles in the United States.

What were most Americans doing when Sept. 11, happened? They were stopping in their tracks, with gasp looks on there faces.

Kate Achille said, “Many in our area were not. I can still remember passing by train-station parking lots full of cars whose drivers weren’t coming back.”

Why would anybody ever want to do something like this to our country? Well that’s a question many people asked for years and it’s still an ongoing question. But, one thing is for sure the people born and able to remember Sept. 11, when it happened will never forget it.

Many millennials today are educated on Sept. 11, but are not completely educated. Many people may not know that the terrorist attacks that occurred were followed by Islam people that had access into the United States. Many may also not know that they did this act because the American people killed billions of their people. Another is that there was a book written on terrorism and that these guys followed this book and worshiped it. There will never be justice for the Sept. 11 attacks but, it is a very good thing to be educated about because it was one of the worst attacks in US history.

Works cited

Achille, Kathy. “Where Were You on September 11, 2001?” The Atlantic, Atlantic Media Company, 8 Sept. 2016, www.theatlantic.com/notes/2016/09/9-11-anniversary/498998/.

Bell, Chris. “The People Who Think 9/11 May Have Been an ‘inside Job’.” BBC News, BBC, 1 Feb. 2018, www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-42195513.

Santhanam, Laura, and Larisa Epatko. “9/11 To Today: Ways We Have Changed.” PBS, Public Broadcasting Service, 11 Sept. 2018, www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/9-11-to-today-ways-we-have-changed.

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By Haley Norris

Guest columnist

Lewistown resident Haley Norris is a junior high school student at Jackson Center Local Schools. She takes classes full times as a college credit plus student at Edison State Community College. This editorial was written as part of a class assignment given by her English Professor Stephen Marlowe.

Lewistown resident Haley Norris is a junior high school student at Jackson Center Local Schools. She takes classes full times as a college credit plus student at Edison State Community College. This editorial was written as part of a class assignment given by her English Professor Stephen Marlowe.