Looking for a giant golf club


Brad Dunham, of Sidney, displays his giant golf ball on a tee that he constructed in his parents’, Mark and Lynne Dunham, yard. The tee he carved from an ash tree that had been growing in the yard until it became infested with the emerald ash borer and died like almost all the ash trees in the area. The tree was not wide enough to make a golf ball so he got some thicker ash tree wood from a friend and carved it into the golf ball before mounting it onto the tee. The golf ball weighs 530 pounds. Dunham used a chainsaw for most of the carving but did some finishing work with a grinder. Dunham chose a golf ball and tee because his father is an avid golfer. A spotlight that had been insalled to illuminate the once healthy ash tree now turns on to light-up the giant sculpture at night.

Brad Dunham, of Sidney, displays his giant golf ball on a tee that he constructed in his parents’, Mark and Lynne Dunham, yard. The tee he carved from an ash tree that had been growing in the yard until it became infested with the emerald ash borer and died like almost all the ash trees in the area. The tree was not wide enough to make a golf ball so he got some thicker ash tree wood from a friend and carved it into the golf ball before mounting it onto the tee. The golf ball weighs 530 pounds. Dunham used a chainsaw for most of the carving but did some finishing work with a grinder. Dunham chose a golf ball and tee because his father is an avid golfer. A spotlight that had been insalled to illuminate the once healthy ash tree now turns on to light-up the giant sculpture at night.


Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News

Brad Dunham, of Sidney, displays his giant golf ball on a tee that he constructed in his parents’, Mark and Lynne Dunham, yard. The tee he carved from an ash tree that had been growing in the yard until it became infested with the emerald ash borer and died like almost all the ash trees in the area. The tree was not wide enough to make a golf ball so he got some thicker ash tree wood from a friend and carved it into the golf ball before mounting it onto the tee. The golf ball weighs 530 pounds. Dunham used a chainsaw for most of the carving but did some finishing work with a grinder. Dunham chose a golf ball and tee because his father is an avid golfer. A spotlight that had been insalled to illuminate the once healthy ash tree now turns on to light-up the giant sculpture at night.

Brad Dunham, of Sidney, displays his giant golf ball on a tee that he constructed in his parents’, Mark and Lynne Dunham, yard. The tee he carved from an ash tree that had been growing in the yard until it became infested with the emerald ash borer and died like almost all the ash trees in the area. The tree was not wide enough to make a golf ball so he got some thicker ash tree wood from a friend and carved it into the golf ball before mounting it onto the tee. The golf ball weighs 530 pounds. Dunham used a chainsaw for most of the carving but did some finishing work with a grinder. Dunham chose a golf ball and tee because his father is an avid golfer. A spotlight that had been insalled to illuminate the once healthy ash tree now turns on to light-up the giant sculpture at night.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2019/09/web1_SDN092119GolfTee.jpgBrad Dunham, of Sidney, displays his giant golf ball on a tee that he constructed in his parents’, Mark and Lynne Dunham, yard. The tee he carved from an ash tree that had been growing in the yard until it became infested with the emerald ash borer and died like almost all the ash trees in the area. The tree was not wide enough to make a golf ball so he got some thicker ash tree wood from a friend and carved it into the golf ball before mounting it onto the tee. The golf ball weighs 530 pounds. Dunham used a chainsaw for most of the carving but did some finishing work with a grinder. Dunham chose a golf ball and tee because his father is an avid golfer. A spotlight that had been insalled to illuminate the once healthy ash tree now turns on to light-up the giant sculpture at night. Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News