Santa Claus is coming to town!


A chat about getting ready for the big night

By Sheryl Roadcap - sroadcap@sidneydailynews.com



Santa Claus waits for the next child to climb upon his lap to discuss his or her Christmas list.

Santa Claus waits for the next child to climb upon his lap to discuss his or her Christmas list.


Courtesy photo

USDA grants Mr. Claus movement permit in U.S.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has issued a movement permit to Mr. S. Nicholas Claus of the North Pole, a broker with Worldwide Gifts, Unlimited. The permit will allow reindeer to enter and exit the United States between the hours of 7 p.m. Dec. 24, 2019 and 7 a.m. Dec. 25, 2019, through or over any U.S. border port.

“With a growing world population, Mr. Claus will have his busiest Christmas yet. At USDA, we want to ensure we are not hindering Mr. Claus’ important work of spreading Christmas Cheer for all to hear,” said Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue. “Ease of access into the United States for Mr. Claus and his nine reindeer will ensure that children all over the country – including my own 14 grandchildren – will wake up on Christmas morning with joy and filled with the spirit of the season. USDA issued this permit in advance and waived all applicable fees to help ensure a smooth trip on Christmas Eve night.”

In addition to the normal disease testing requirements, flying reindeer must undergo additional tests to ensure they will be able to safely handle significant changes in altitude and temperature throughout their journey, and are fit for landing on rooftops. On this year’s health certificate, the accredited veterinarian noted that one of the reindeer named Rudolph was positive for “red nose syndrome,” however, it was also explained that this is normal for him and not an animal health concern. The veterinarian also verified the reindeer have been vaccinated against any diseases they could encounter on their trip around the world.

At the request of Mr. and Mrs. Claus, APHIS also completed a courtesy welfare and humane treatment check of the reindeer facility. Mr. Claus and his staff passed with flying colors.

They will arrive pulling a wooden sleigh with jingling bells attached, filled with brightly wrapped gifts. Port personnel will clean and disinfect the runners and underside of the sleigh at the time of entry, and will also conduct a short visual inspection of the reindeer. Mr. Claus will also have his boots disinfected and will thoroughly wash his hands. These measures are intended to prevent the entry of any livestock diseases the team may encounter during deliveries to farms around the world prior to entering the United States.

“It would be a disaster for Worldwide Gifts, Unlimited, if my reindeer were to unintentionally bring in foot and mouth disease along with all the gifts,” explained Mr. Claus. “Why, something like that could put me out of business. That’s why we work all year to keep the reindeer healthy and take all possible precautions before and during our trip.”

Mr. Claus has also provided an advance list of what port personnel should expect upon their arrival. This includes a variety of food items, all of which come from approved locations and none of which pose a threat to U.S. animal or plant health.

THE NORTH POLE — “You better watch out. You better not cry. You better not pout, I’m telling you why, Santa Claus is coming to town!“

Despite being super busy, the man of the hour, Santa Claus himself, took some time to call-in and chat with the Sidney Daily News about getting ready for the big night quickly approaching — Christmas Eve.

Preparations for that magical night begins the very next day after Christmas for the next year, Santa said.

“It takes a full calender-year to get ready for Christmas. On Dec. 26, after I get home, we start all over again for the next Christmas,” Saint Nick said. “Mrs. Claus gets up when I arrive back home to the North Pole, and we celebrate our Christmas together and then I take a break for the rest of that day. And then I get right back to it the next day.”

When asked if the elves are good at making computerized toys, he said they do the best they can, but sometimes he needs to reach out to other toy companies for help on how to put certain types of toys together. Santa also admitted with the increase of technology, it has absolutely changed the way they do things at the North Pole.

“There has been so many changes at the North Pole and additions to my sleigh with GPS, radar and guidance systems. There are so many things in the sky nowadays, those things help keep Santa and the reindeer safe,” he said. “And the elves still make things by hand in the old-time way, but we also have computer programmers and electronic toy making elves up at the North Pole. And they all really have to work hard to put that stuff together for the good little boys and girls of the world.”

“The magic of Christmas” is the only way to answer how all of the toys for so many millions of children fits into his sleigh. But Santa also admitted that on occasion he has forgotten things for the trip.

“I try not to, but sometimes it does happen. There are times Christmas magic helps on that rare occasion when a special toy is missed, but sometimes we don’t get everything we want for Christmas. But Santa does the best he can,” the big guy explained.

The exact route he and the reindeer take on Christmas Eve was the one thing he refused to comment much on.

“Well, Santa will never ever, ever give away his exact route,” he said with a chuckle. “Because it would be too predictable. And if little girls and boys would have the exact route, then they would know how late they would need to stay up and catch Santa Claus (at their house) and that would make the magic very difficult.”

In terms of how to build he and the reindeer’s stamina to be in tip-top shape for his annual global rounds, he said Mrs. Claus works hard to make sure he is well feed.

“I make sure the reindeer are always fed right with plenty of good feed. And Mrs. Claus does a really good job of making sure that Santa Claus is very well rested and well nourished. Sometimes, I get so caught up in the season and forget to eat or rest and get enough sleep. So she he is very big factor in making sure I am ready for the trip on Christmas Eve,” Santa said.

He was almost stumped when asked what is Santa’s most favorite cookie?

“Oh, boy… there are just so many good cookies of the world that Santa loves. But ya know, I think there are two favorites. You got the good-ole faithful chocolate chip — that is probably at the top of the list — but I also love the peanut butter cookie with a chocolate kiss on top,” Santa admitted. “And just plain white milk is good for Santa Clause.”

When enjoying his cookies and milk during his brief break before leaving the homes of the good little boys and girls, Santa will take the time to stop and read any notes or letters sometimes left for him.

“I guess the biggest thing I want to share is to remember what the season is about. And boys and girls, be good for your mommies and daddies, follow the rules and make sure to be on the nice list,” Santa said before hanging up the phone to get back to work. “And also, make sure you get to bed nice and early on Christmas Eve. Then Santa will be there to leave your treasures for you to find the next morning.”

To track Santa Claus’s general whereabouts on Christmas Eve, visit https://www.noradsanta.org/

Santa Claus waits for the next child to climb upon his lap to discuss his or her Christmas list.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2019/12/web1_Santa.jpgSanta Claus waits for the next child to climb upon his lap to discuss his or her Christmas list. Courtesy photo
A chat about getting ready for the big night

By Sheryl Roadcap

sroadcap@sidneydailynews.com

USDA grants Mr. Claus movement permit in U.S.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has issued a movement permit to Mr. S. Nicholas Claus of the North Pole, a broker with Worldwide Gifts, Unlimited. The permit will allow reindeer to enter and exit the United States between the hours of 7 p.m. Dec. 24, 2019 and 7 a.m. Dec. 25, 2019, through or over any U.S. border port.

“With a growing world population, Mr. Claus will have his busiest Christmas yet. At USDA, we want to ensure we are not hindering Mr. Claus’ important work of spreading Christmas Cheer for all to hear,” said Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue. “Ease of access into the United States for Mr. Claus and his nine reindeer will ensure that children all over the country – including my own 14 grandchildren – will wake up on Christmas morning with joy and filled with the spirit of the season. USDA issued this permit in advance and waived all applicable fees to help ensure a smooth trip on Christmas Eve night.”

In addition to the normal disease testing requirements, flying reindeer must undergo additional tests to ensure they will be able to safely handle significant changes in altitude and temperature throughout their journey, and are fit for landing on rooftops. On this year’s health certificate, the accredited veterinarian noted that one of the reindeer named Rudolph was positive for “red nose syndrome,” however, it was also explained that this is normal for him and not an animal health concern. The veterinarian also verified the reindeer have been vaccinated against any diseases they could encounter on their trip around the world.

At the request of Mr. and Mrs. Claus, APHIS also completed a courtesy welfare and humane treatment check of the reindeer facility. Mr. Claus and his staff passed with flying colors.

They will arrive pulling a wooden sleigh with jingling bells attached, filled with brightly wrapped gifts. Port personnel will clean and disinfect the runners and underside of the sleigh at the time of entry, and will also conduct a short visual inspection of the reindeer. Mr. Claus will also have his boots disinfected and will thoroughly wash his hands. These measures are intended to prevent the entry of any livestock diseases the team may encounter during deliveries to farms around the world prior to entering the United States.

“It would be a disaster for Worldwide Gifts, Unlimited, if my reindeer were to unintentionally bring in foot and mouth disease along with all the gifts,” explained Mr. Claus. “Why, something like that could put me out of business. That’s why we work all year to keep the reindeer healthy and take all possible precautions before and during our trip.”

Mr. Claus has also provided an advance list of what port personnel should expect upon their arrival. This includes a variety of food items, all of which come from approved locations and none of which pose a threat to U.S. animal or plant health.

Reach the writer at 937-538-4823.

Reach the writer at 937-538-4823.