Ashes to ashes


Deacon Phil Myers, left, sprinkles ashes in the hair of Holy Angels Catholic School student Layla Platfoot, 14, of Sidney, daughter of Chad and Jenni Platfoot, during an Ash Wednesday ceremony at Holy Angels Catholic Church on Wednesday, Feb. 17. The church sprinkled the ashes this year instead of drawing them into crosses on foreheads to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The ashes symbolize that people were made by God from dust and will return to dust. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent a time of abstinence and fasting.

Deacon Phil Myers, left, sprinkles ashes in the hair of Holy Angels Catholic School student Layla Platfoot, 14, of Sidney, daughter of Chad and Jenni Platfoot, during an Ash Wednesday ceremony at Holy Angels Catholic Church on Wednesday, Feb. 17. The church sprinkled the ashes this year instead of drawing them into crosses on foreheads to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The ashes symbolize that people were made by God from dust and will return to dust. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent a time of abstinence and fasting.


Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News

Deacon Phil Myers, left, sprinkles ashes in the hair of Holy Angels Catholic School student Layla Platfoot, 14, of Sidney, daughter of Chad and Jenni Platfoot, during an Ash Wednesday ceremony at Holy Angels Catholic Church on Wednesday, Feb. 17. The church sprinkled the ashes this year instead of drawing them into crosses on foreheads to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The ashes symbolize that people were made by God from dust and will return to dust. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent a time of abstinence and fasting.

Deacon Phil Myers, left, sprinkles ashes in the hair of Holy Angels Catholic School student Layla Platfoot, 14, of Sidney, daughter of Chad and Jenni Platfoot, during an Ash Wednesday ceremony at Holy Angels Catholic Church on Wednesday, Feb. 17. The church sprinkled the ashes this year instead of drawing them into crosses on foreheads to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The ashes symbolize that people were made by God from dust and will return to dust. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent a time of abstinence and fasting.
https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2021/02/web1_SDN021821AshWed-1.jpgDeacon Phil Myers, left, sprinkles ashes in the hair of Holy Angels Catholic School student Layla Platfoot, 14, of Sidney, daughter of Chad and Jenni Platfoot, during an Ash Wednesday ceremony at Holy Angels Catholic Church on Wednesday, Feb. 17. The church sprinkled the ashes this year instead of drawing them into crosses on foreheads to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The ashes symbolize that people were made by God from dust and will return to dust. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent a time of abstinence and fasting. Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News