No more lonely days


Tom and Dee and Cousin Key



Dear Grandparenting: Things finally changed for the better. I’m talking about my new living arrangements. I was miserable three months ago. Now I’m feeling like I’ve rejoined the human race.

I thought long and hard about making the big move. I was still living in the same rowhouse where I raised my children. But the neighborhood was changing for the worse and I can’t get around like I used to. It was pretty much just me and the cat and I was getting wacky.

That’s why I moved in with my daughter’s family. It’s not perfect, but I have my own bathroom and bedroom and a backyard with peace and quiet and a big garden.

My daughter says we both win. She saves a fortune since I handle day care for my two-year-old grandson Liam. And I stopped feeling so lonely and useless. Pass it on! Bess Shifflett, Baltimore, Maryland

Dear Bess: You are right in step with a change in the structure of the American family that emphasizes intergenerational living and deemphasizes the so-called nuclear family that so many grandparents grew up with — a mom, a dad and some kids.

And as the movement gathers steam, the results of a major study on multiple generations under one roof by Pew Research shows how people feel about living with extended family and why they chose it.

As of March 2021, nearly 60 million Americans were living with multiple generations; financial issues and caregiving needs were the two main reasons why. Pew reports that Americans who live with relatives are generally pleased. More adults found the experience to be very positive (30%) or somewhat positive (27%), compared to somewhat negative (14%) or very negative (3%).

As we live longer, multigenerational bonds for millions are becoming more important than traditional nuclear family bonds, for their well-being and support over the course of a lifetime, while helping combat the “loneliness epidemic” that often preys on grandparents and other seniors.

Grand remark of the week

Suzy Jacks from Monterey, California handed six-year-old grandson Henry a paper napkin to clean his fingers during a backyard family picnic.

“Thanks but no thanks,” said Henry. “Mom says it’s OK to just lick it off when I’m outside.”

https://www.sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/47/2022/05/Tom-and-Dee-byline-2.pdf

Tom and Dee and Cousin Key

Dee and Tom, married more than 50 years, have eight grandchildren. Together with Key, they welcome questions, suggestions and Grand Remarks of the Week. Send to P.O. Box 27454, Towson, MD, 21285. Call 410-963-4426.

Dee and Tom, married more than 50 years, have eight grandchildren. Together with Key, they welcome questions, suggestions and Grand Remarks of the Week. Send to P.O. Box 27454, Towson, MD, 21285. Call 410-963-4426.